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Little condo in the valley

When I was little, I was obsessed with a huge fan of Little House On the Prairie. So much so that I went around in braids and my frontier dress and boots–and I’m pretty sure I may have asked my mother for a petticoat, a slate, and a lunch pail, but my parents had to draw the line somewhere.

Anyway… I read these books religiously and loved to imagine what it would be like to be Laura Ingalls (never mind that I never could have made a go of it in the 19th century; let’s just say that I like the convenience of modern plumbing and electricity too much). The books made an indelible impression on my young mind, and to this day, I can still recall random little vignettes from the books with ease. One such vignette was the chapter in the first book, Little House In the Big Woods, in which Ma Ingalls and the girls made butter.

I never forgot that passage, and so recently, when I learned from a friend that all it takes to make your own butter is some heavy whipping cream and plenty of arm muscle (or a Kitchenaid stand mixer with a whisk attachment; I happen to have the latter), I decided I was going to give it a go.

Homemade butter

The whisk attachment: your best friend in butter-making

Today, I set about channeling my inner Ma Ingalls and did just that. I made my own butter. It was ridiculously easy. Seriously. Two steps, folks:

  1.  Pour heavy cream (along with a pinch of salt–although that is optional) into the stand mixer.
  2. Whisk at high speed. And whisk and whisk and whisk until it looks like this picture below…
Homemade butter

Who needs a butter churn?

Look at that! Real, honest to goodness butter. No preservatives, no artificial colors or flavors, no scary hydrogenated anything. Just butter.

Homemade butter

Butter, all ready to go in the fridge

I may never buy butter again.

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About writejenwrite

Silicon Valley marketer by day, novelist-in-training by night--running addict, foodie, bookworm, pop culture enthusiast, and aspiring philanthropist in between.

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